Reply To: TPO 49 Integrated Writing: humpback whales migrate long distances with the help of stars.

TOEFL, IELTS, Personal Statement and CV Proofreading Services. TOEFL Writing TPO 49 Integrated Writing: humpback whales migrate long distances with the help of stars. Reply To: TPO 49 Integrated Writing: humpback whales migrate long distances with the help of stars.

January 14, 2020 at 4:31 pm

Score: 67.5

In the reading, the author cites three pieces of evidence to prove that humpback whales probably migrate long distance with their abilities to navigate by stars. However, the speaker in the listening[wrong word  ] argues that none of the evidence is unconvincing. [ wrong word ]

To begin with, the author claims that humpback whales are intelligent enough to employ the star system for navigation. However, the speaker states that intelligence may have nothing to do with the ability to navigate by stars. Take the ducks for example, they only have average intelligence, but they can also utilize the stars to find their ways. For these birds, navigation by [ article error ]star is not an ability resulting from high intelligence but an instinct they were born with. Thus, intelligence and [  article error ]ability to navigating[ grammatical error ] by stars is [BE verb/remains unrelated  ]not directly connected[NOT  ].

In addition, the author maintains that humpback whales have to rely on external objects to migrate in straight lines. As there are no land features in the ocean, they must have depended on stars. Yet, the speaker objects to this opinion because there is an alternative explanation. Humpback whales may have sensed the earth[ form error/earth’s ] magnetic field with the bio-magnitude in their brain. That is to say, the external object they hinge on is the earth magnetic field instead of the stars.

Finally, the author asserts that the spy-hopping observed among humpback whales is [ article error ]direct proof that they are looking at the stars, but the speaker denies it. According to the speaker, there is no causal relationship between spy-hopping and looking at the stars. Sharks, for instance, are also observed spy-hopping, but they do not migrate. When spy-hopping, sharks are looking for preys rather than stars. Moreover, humpback whales are doing spy-hopping during the daytime when there are no stars in the sky. Consequently, this evidence is not at all supportive.