All too often, companies hire outside consultants to suggest ways for the company to operate more efficiently. If companies were to spend more time listening to their own employees, such consultants would be unnecessary.

TOEFL, IELTS, Personal Statement and CV Proofreading Services. GRE Writing All too often, companies hire outside consultants to suggest ways for the company to operate more efficiently. If companies were to spend more time listening to their own employees, such consultants would be unnecessary.

  • yanyang
    University: University of Nevada, Reno
    Nationality: China
    February 20, 2021 at 7:32 am

    All too often, companies hire outside consultants to suggest ways for the company to operate more efficiently. If companies were to spend more time listening to their own employees, such consultants would be unnecessary.

    There has been a long-lasting debate on whether companies should hire outside consultants for opinions on company operation. Some think employees is a better source of opinions and is already enough, while others believe consultants have their value. In my opinion, while company employees do have their valuable opinions on company operation, those are not enough to substitute experts’ stances from outside the company.

    First of all, consultants have more expertise in company operation. To become an expertised consultant, they have to spend time learning theories about the market and the comapny operation. They also investigate the situation in the current market into depth. All these information are different from what company employees have. Employees usually have various expertise areas and have to spend time on their daily work rather than the broader but less relevant information outside there in the market. Even people in a company’s marketing department usually have different focuses than a general non-employee consultant.

    At the mean time, consultants have different interest stances than company employees and thus can provide viewpoints from different perspectives. It is human nature to be selfish, so for company employees, they often hope company policies can benefit themselves, especially when nowadays changing employers is quite normal, people don’t necessarily provide suggestions merely based on the company’s benefits. Of course, there is a lot of overlaps between a comapny’s and its employees’ benefits, but taking suggestions only from employees really could be partial. Outside consultants are not 100% reliable, either, but combining opinions from both sides is a viable way to reduce biases of their oppinions, and is what a wise leader would consider.

    So, it’s already obvious in the last paragraph, but I’d like to emphasize it again, that by suggesting taking opinions from consultants, I’m not denying the necessity of learning employees’ viewpoints. The latter is not a complete picture of what company leaders might want to know about their operations, but also worth consideration.

    In general, I believe taking opinions from outside consultants is not a waste of money and time, although it’s definitely a better way to take opinions from both consultants and employees, with opinions from each of both sides compensating those from the other.

    Administrator
    University: University of Wisconsin
    February 21, 2021 at 12:51 am

    Score: 41.1

    Issues:

    1. About 50% of the sentences exceed 20 words. Simplify or split them. (TOEFL/IELTS: 15%- qualifies for non-software revision; 30% applies to GRE writing)
    2. Use your own words to write the first paragraph;
    3. Lots of grammatical errors and logical inconsistencies.

    I will send you screenshots to illustrate specific problems/errors.

    yanyang
    University: University of Nevada, Reno
    Nationality: China
    March 1, 2021 at 5:57 am

    Revised:

     

    When it comes to getting opinions on company operation, there has been a long-lasting debate. This debate focuses on whether to hire outside consultants. Some think employees constitute a better source of opinions, which is already enough, while others believe consultants have their value. In my opinion, while company employees do have their valuable insights on company operation, those are not enough to substitute stances from experts outside the company.

    First of all, consultants have more expertise in company operation. To become an expertised consultant, they have to spend time learning theories about the market and the company operation. As daily work, they also investigate the situation in the current market in depth. All these kinds of information are usually different from what company employees have. Instead of digging deep into knowledge for company operations, employees usually have diverse expertise areas. They have to spend time on their daily work, rather than collecting information from broader resources. Even people in a company’s operation board are usually occupied by tasks and decisions their own company is facing. They seldom have the chance to do the kind of thorough and versatile research that a non-company-affiliated consultant does.

    In the meantime, consultants have different stances than company employees. Therefore, they can provide viewpoints from different perspectives. It is human nature to be selfish, so for company employees, their stances are often based on whether company policies benefit themselves. It’s especially the case, when considering that switching to new employers is quite normal nowadays. Of course, there are a lot of overlaps between a company’s and its employees’ benefits, but taking suggestions only from employees could really be partial. It has to be admitted that outside consultants are not 100% reliable, either. However, combining opinions from both sides is a viable way to reduce biases from their opinions. It’s also what a wise leader would consider.

    Lastly, by suggesting taking opinions from consultants, I’m not denying the necessity of learning employees’ viewpoints. This is already obvious in the last paragraph, but I’d like to emphasize it again. Company leaders might want to learn a fuller view on their company operations. Employees’ viewpoints do not constitute a complete picture in this sense, but they are worth to be considered.

    In general, I believe taking opinions from outside consultants is definitely not wasting money and time. That being said, to take opinions from both consultants and employees, with opinions from each side compensating those from the other, is still better than consultants alone.

     

    Administrator
    University: University of Wisconsin
    March 1, 2021 at 8:36 pm

    When it comes to getting opinions on company operation, there has been a long-lasting debate. This debate focuses on whether to hire outside consultants. [Use your own words to write   ]Some think employees constitute a better source of opinions, which is [sufficient for companies to make informed, actionable decisions   ]already enough, [ punctuation error  ]while others believe [independent   ] consultants have their value [ to support corporate management  ]. In my opinion, while company employees do have their valuable insights on company operation, those (are not enough)[ avoid using NOT here and replace BE verb with a concrete verb  ] to substitute stances from experts outside the[ article error (learn the contexts in which THE is used)  ] company.

    First of all, consultants have more [change a word/ more…than…   ] expertise in (company operation)[ word choice problem  ]. To become an expertised[ word form error  ] consultant, they have to spend time learning theories about the [ article error  ]market and the [article error   ] company operation. As daily work, they also [ need to thoroughly  ] investigate [current market conditions   ] the situation in the current market in depth. All these kinds of information (are usually different )[ usually differ  ]from what company employees have. Instead of digging deep into knowledge for company operations, employees usually have diverse expertise areas. They have to spend time on their daily work, [ punctuation error  ]rather than collecting information from broader resources. Even people in a company’s (operation board)[ unclear  ] are usually occupied by tasks and decisions their own company[ repetition  ] is facing[ faces  ]. [Missing a transitory word   ]They seldom have the chance to (do the kind[ repetition  ] of thorough and versatile research)[ unclear  ] that a non-company-affiliated consultant does.

    In the meantime, consultants have (different stances than)[grammatical error   ] company employees. Therefore, they can provide viewpoints from different perspectives. It is [ article error  ]human nature to be selfish, so for company employees, their stances are often based on whether company policies benefit themselves. It[unclear pronoun   ]’s especially the case, [punctuation error   ]when considering that switching to new employers is quite normal nowadays. Of course, there are a lot of overlaps between a company’s and its employees’ benefits, but taking suggestions only from employees could really (be partial)[ unclear  ]. It has to be admitted that outside[wrong word   ] consultants are not 100% reliable, either. However, combining opinions from both sides is a viable way to reduce biases from their[ unclear pronoun  ] opinions. It[  unclear pronoun ]’s also what a wise leader would consider.

    Lastly, by suggesting taking opinions from consultants, I’m not denying the necessity of learning employees’ viewpoints. This is already obvious in the last paragraph, but I’d like to emphasize it again. Company[wrong word   ] leaders might want to learn a fuller view on their company operations. Employees’ viewpoints do not constitute a complete picture in this sense, but they are worth to be considered.

    In general, I believe taking opinions from outside consultants is definitely not wasting money and time. That being said, to take opinions from both consultants and employees, with opinions from each side compensating those from the other, is still better than consultants alone[ unclear  ].